Solitude of Self

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solitude-01.jpg

Solitude of Self

10.95

By Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Speech originally presented to Congress in 1892.

Non-Fiction

$10.95
6 1/2 x 4 1/2, 56 pp
1-930464-01-0
978-1-930464-01-8

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Throughout Solitude of Self, Elizabeth Cady Stanton reflects on solitude and its integral relationship to self-reliance and equality. She asserts that we face our most challenging moments alone, and that it is the birthright of every person to be prepared for these moments — regardless of gender, race, religion, or wealth. If we are equally educated and equally trained on all fronts of life, then, says Stanton, we can call upon our inner resources when we need them most. 

Comments & Reviews

"This is pronounced the strongest & most unanswerable argument & appeal ever made of mortal pen & tongue — for the full freedom & franchise of women." Susan B. Anthony

“[The speech] stands as a rhetorical masterpiece because it explores the values underlying natural rights philosophy, because it responds creatively to the problems faced by social movements as their arguments become familiar to audiences, and because it still has the capacity to speak to contemporary audiences.” Karlyn Kohrs Campbell

"'With the power of her mind, her rhetoric, her voice, she would be ballistic if she were here today.' Jill Ker Conway, who was the first woman president of Smith College, told a packed St. John's Episcopal Church on Tuesday, July 10…. The evening was a celebration of Stanton who, perhaps even more than her better-known friend Susan B. Anthony, changed the course of history by struggling for more than fifty years with amazing courage and strength — while raising seven children — to make it possible for women to vote. It was a celebration of the hard work and passion of Jan Freeman and her Paris Press, who published the speech and organized the reading, dedicated to Mary Seymour Lucas, to whom Jan Freeman paid a moving tribute. It was a celebration of women, and there were quite a few men in the audience. It was a rich, moving, funny, powerful, enlightening evening." The Ashfield News